Figurative Language
Figurative Language
Learn about 8 kinds of figurative language: metaphor, simile, personification, hyperbole, understatement, idioms, analogy, and irony. They're figures of speech. You probably already use them all the time, but might not know the terminology. And learning to recognize it when you read helps you appreciate what's good about the writing. Figurative language adds subtle shades of meaning to your words and brings out your personality in your writing so you don't sound like a robot from an old movie. It brings your language to life. It jumps off the page, grabs your reader…Read more »
How to Write a Haiku
How to Write a Haiku
Learn how to write a traditional haiku, including the 5-7-5 rule, subject matter, and structure. Learn what a "kigo" is and why your poem should contain a shift or movement of some kind. Learn also what you should do when you disagree with the dictionary about how many syllables a word contains. Haiku is often written by kids, but it is also an adult poetic form written by and for adults. One of the most notable differences between haiku and Western poems is its compression of a single moment and that flash of…Read more »
How to Write a Sonnet
How to Write a Sonnet
The sonnet is one of the most popular of all poetic forms and is often taught in schools. This video will show you what a sonnet is and how to write one. Topics include rhyme schemes for Shakespearean and Petrarchan sonnets, iambic pentameter, the quatrain, the "turn," couplet, as well as the appropriate subject matter for a sonnet. Sonnet writing can be hard at first. It’s a really good challenge for a writer. But if you can juggle those three things: the rhyme scheme, the rhythm, and the structure, and actually say something…Read more »
How Does Word Choice Affect Tone and Meaning?
How Does Word Choice Affect Tone and Meaning?
Learn the difference between denotation and connotation, why "affluent" feels different from "rich," how connotations create the author's tone, and how both create meaning. Closely study a poem by Ernest Hemingway, "All armies are the same..." Hemingway's poem, written about his experiences in World War I, remains a devastating statement about war seen from the soldier's perspective. This video addresses the Common Core standard, CCSS-ELA Literacy RL9-10.4:"Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices…Read more »
Comparing a Work of Literature With Its Source
Comparing a Work of Literature With Its Source
Learn how to compare a work of literature with its source, like comparing Rick Riordan'sThe Lightning Thief with the Greek myths on which he based the stories. This video will demonstrate this skill in action by showing a step-by-step analysis of the well-known baseball poem, "Casey at the Bat," by Ernest Lawrence Thayer, and a parody of it by Garrison Keillor, best known as the former host of A Prairie Home Companion, on NPR. This corresponds to the Common Core 9th grade ELA reading standard: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.9 Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: "Analyze how…Read more »
Rhyming
Rhyming
Are you going to write a rhymed poem? There's more to rhyming than most people think. This video is an overview of rhymes and rhyming, including perfect rhymes, near rhymes, mosaic rhymes, "masculine" and "feminine" rhymes. Things to avoid: forced rhymes and eye rhymes.Read more »
Gertrude the Ghost Cow
Gertrude the Ghost Cow
This is a rhymed narrative poem that can be used to teach rhyming and rhythm. "Gertrude" is a little dark, a little cute, and was a lot of fun to write. It would be appropriate for many elementary students, especially for Halloween, but a lot of 9th graders have enjoyed this. It can be useful for teaching rhyme, rhythm, and various narrative devices. The poem is nine 8-line stanzas. The rhyme scheme is ABCB. "Masculine," "feminine," and mosaic rhymes are used. The rhythm alternates between 4 and 3 beats per line (in effect,…Read more »