How to Find a Theme
How to Find a Theme
Theme is the most important element in a work of literature because the theme is the literary work’s primary purpose. Topics in this video include what it is, how a subject differs from a theme, how theme is a model of the real world, and multiple ways to find a theme. Also discussed is why the ability to make abstract meaning from a model is one of the things that makes us human. Examples are used from The Lion King, Crime and Punishment, "If I Forget Thee, O Earth" by Arthur C. Clarke,…Read more »
Plot Structure, feat. Freytag’s Triangle
Plot Structure, feat. Freytag’s Triangle
Learn how to organize your story's plot. This focuses on Freytag's Triangle (AKA Freytag's Pyramid, Plot Pyramid, Story Mountain, Dramatic Arc, The Elements of Plot), including the terms, "exposition," "conflict," "rising action," "climax," and "resolution" or "denouement." Also explained are three other less commonly taught narrative plot structures: The Hero's Journey, Kishotenketsu, and The Episodic Plot. Examples draw from The Hunger Games, Star Wars, Gulliver's Travels, and "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin. These structures, these frameworks, are really helpful for examining the structure of a literary work. They're also very…Read more »
Characterization
Characterization
Learn about how authors create, develop, and develop their characters. Terms include: protagonist, antagonist, flat, round, static, dynamic, direct and indirect characterization. Learn also how the ability to understand fictional characters can help you understand your own role in your world, as well as that of other people. Examples are drawn from Iron Man, Batman, Harry Potter, Holes, Star Wars, A Christmas Carol, and The Lion King. Characterization is one of the most important elements of fiction, because a story can have all the dramatic events in the world, the most interesting setting,…Read more »
Why is a Story’s Setting Important?
Why is a Story’s Setting Important?
Learn about the importance of setting in fiction and movies. Setting includes the place, time, and social context. Look at how setting can be symbolic, or essential to understanding the plot. Setting is inseparably connected to the other 5 Elements of Fiction: Plot, Characterization, POV, and Theme. Examples are taken from The Grapes of Wrath, Tyrell, The Fault in Our Stars, Number the Stars, Eragon, To Kill a Mockingbird, the 1995 movie, Clueless, and other sources. This video also asks you to look around you at your real-life setting. Is this the setting…Read more »
POV: Point-of-View
POV: Point-of-View
Learn the different kinds of narrative POV: reliable first person, unreliable first person, omniscient third person, limited third person, objective third person, and even the rarely-used second person. Examples are used from Great Expectations, Flowers For Algernon, Sherlock, "The Tell-Tale Heart" by Edgar Allan Poe, and Bright Lights, Big City. Understanding narrative POV is a valuable critical thinking skill. For example, when an advertiser tells you that its product is great, or when a politician tells you the country is on the wrong track, it’s important to remember who is telling you this…Read more »